St Peter’s Seminary, Kilmahew estate, Cardross

Above is a reblog of Ruth Craggs’ account of a recent daytrip to the modern ruins of the St Peter’s Seminary at Kilmahew, outside Glasgow. I went along too. Ruth’s account ably captures the essence of the place and the visit.

Conserving the Twentieth Century

Hannah and I took part in a field day to St Peter’s Seminary at Cardross last Monday. Despite predictions of torrential rain, we set out, anorak clad to see the modernist masterpiece, held up as the finest of its type in Scotland, now in ruins.

The day was organised by Dr Hayden Lorimer and Dr Michael Gallagher, of the University of Glasgow, who are working with the Scottish Arts Charity NVA on a project called the Invisible College. The Invisible College aims to bring together academics, artists and the public in various ways to use the ruins of St Peter’s and the surrounding Kilmahew estate in which it sits, in new creative ways.

We spent some of the day walking around the Victorian-designed Kilmahew estate woodland and gardens (now partly overgrown but being put to use growing potatoes and other vegetables), accompanied by a sound walk put together…

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About lukebennett13
Reader & Course Leader, BSc Hons Real Estate, Sheffield Hallam University, UK. I TEACH: built environment law to construction, surveying, real estate and environmental management students. I RESEARCH: metal theft; urban exploration & recreational trespass; occupiers' perceptions of liability for their premises. I THINK: about the links between ideas, materialities and practices in the built environment. I WAS: an environmental lawyer working in commercial practice for 17 years before I joined academia in 2007. I EXPLAIN: the aims of my blogsite site here: https://lukebennett13.wordpress.com/2012/02/15/prosaic/ LINKS: Twitter: @lukebennett13; Archive: http://shu.academia.edu/lukebennett. EPITAPH: “He lived at a little distance from his body, regarding his own acts with doubtful side-glances.” James Joyce, Dubliners

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